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AHAJE JUHA

AHAJE JUHA

Juha was and still is a very important figure in Arabic literature (mainly the verbal literature) and Juha was a name for Dujain ibn Thabit in the early days of Islamic civil society (1,400 years approx.) with a very rich collection of humour in contradicted forms of wisdom and foolish or unpredictable material, which all make a sounding point of view towards people, politics and behaviour of the society in all its endeavours. But Juha did not stop here, as one man as he was in the beginning, but other people who have an exceptional talent like the original Juha had been added during the Arab and Islamic societies through history.

Among them was Al Khawaja Nusserudin (a Turk) etc and then the influence of all that moved to European countries, Italy, Germany, Spain and others, until it came to England – where we now have the expression ‘Jokes’ which came from ‘Etalian Jokha‘ derived from the Arabic Juha – the reader is encouraged to research this point. The references are plenty in the early European renaissance.

Original name (Arabic): أحاجي جحا
Original production date: 2003
Artwork Size: 152cm x 124cm
Materials: Acrylic on paper, mounted on canvas
Location of Original: Private Collector






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