Over 50 Years of Art | Welcome to Ali Omar Ermes
ALIF SUCOON

ALIF SUCOON

With eight lines of the poem by Muaan Ibn Aws. The verses describe the poet’s stand for honour, rejecting and condemning corruption and social decay.

This is one of a series of four Musical Alifs each with different short vowels, the others being Alif Kesrah, Alif Fethah, and Alif Dhammah, the respective sounds given to the letter by the short vowels are i, a and u, the succoon of the Alif Succoon meaning silence. Thus the artist engages with the expression of the poem, using form, colour, texture, and sound, by using the four vowels of the Alif in its four degrees from low to high.

Continue Reading →


TUGHRA

TUGHRA

This vibrant piece contains the verse from the learned philosopher-poet Abul Ala Al Ma’arri, in which he says:

“When I utter the implausible, I can shout it out loud without fear or favour, but when I speak of the truth I have to whisper”

Continue Reading →


HARF UL DAL

HARF UL DAL

This piece is about the power of the single stroke technique which Ali Omar Ermes employs as a hallmark of a number of his works.

It explores the vast richness of the Arabic language and the magnitude of the depth of expression in Arabic with the simplest and most direct method or as complicated as you wish.

Continue Reading →


HARF AL-HAA: COLOUR IN MOTION

HARF AL-HAA: COLOUR IN MOTION

The inscription from a poem by the poet Al Hutayya promises rewards in this world and Hereafter for anyone who delivers a good deed.

Continue Reading →


AAAKHEN AKH!

AAAKHEN AKH!

This piece was dedicated to the United Nations in the context of the Bosnia tragedy, containing poems by Ali Omar Ermes. A quote by Dr. Riad Nourallah (Senior Lecturer at the Diplomatic Academy of London) describes this artwork well:

“In ‘Akh!’ or ‘Aahhh!’ (1993), a diptych dedicated to the United Nations, the sense of anguish expressed by the groaning sound of the word, itself cradling in tiny script a moving poem by the artist/poet, seems to accentuate, beyond its immediate historical context and collective concern, the artist’s own agony as he labours to transmute pain into creativity and senselessness into meaning.”

Continue Reading →


AD DAL AND AZ ZAL

AD DAL AND AZ ZAL

The twin letters. With poems by the wise and well-quoted poet Abul Atahiyah, from the Abbasid period. In them, he argues that self-sustenance, one of the sweetest of all things to have, is complete self-reliance as it gives one self-respect and dignity and one of the hardest things of all is to ask favours from people.

Continue Reading →


THE DAWN BREAK

THE DAWN BREAK

Between the elements of colours and sound, it is self-evident that we have a state of comprehension, a state of wanting for new beginnings.

Poems by Qotam Ebni Khabeeh, known as Sullotan, advising his son in a storytelling manner about life and values, this piece of poetry has a very rare property of combining the deadliest serious of all matters in the most beautifully sweet and musically moving sounds.

Continue Reading →


ALIF EL AHAT

ALIF EL AHAT

A A A A. A cries through the ages and through the conscience of humankind. It was shown periodically in Islamic Conferences in Geneva around the year of 1992 to commemorate the expulsion by torture, torment, burning of people and their intellectual properties, books etc, to uproot the Muslims from Spain since 1492.

Continue Reading →


LA (NO)

LA (NO)

It recalls samples of poetry which reject domination by big powers as much as it rejects acts of terrorism by individuals, states or invading armies as much as it condemns corruption, environmental and cultural abuses. Lines of poetry expressing in general or some in specific terms that we are all in this together.

Continue Reading →


AL HAA

AL HAA

Poems by Antar Ben Shadad, the famous Arab warrior-poet, who is known for his love story with Ablah and his courage and chivalry. In this poem, he describes some of his experiences where actions speak louder than words. He speaks of fairness, steadfastness, and courage in the face of hopelessness and great despair.

Continue Reading →


WA LAN

WA LAN

La, Kalla, Wa Lan – This is a trio.

Recalls samples of poetry which rejects domination by big powers as much as it rejects acts of terrorism by individuals, states or invading armies as much as it condemns corruption, environmental and cultural abuses.

Continue Reading →


MULTIPLE FORMS

MULTIPLE FORMS

One of the foremost calligraphers of our time, Ali Omar Ermes composes peerless images from the word. Steeped in faith and the concepts of Islam, this work is a homage to the life of the Prophet Mohammad through the Qasidat al-Burda (The Poem of the Cloak) by al-Busairi. The poem was compiled under great duress by the Sufi master al-Busairi (A.D. 1212-1296). Having suffered a major stroke and paralysis on the left side of his body, the sheikh composed and recited his poem as a mantra during his illness. In its repetition, he found great solace.

Continue Reading →


NOON – THE SHARP AND COMPETENT

NOON – THE SHARP AND COMPETENT

Preparing the mental state, bringing all elements of the piece you want to work on, between the simplicity or the complexity of colour, an instrument of application in material such as colour, brush, paper, canvas, etc. Not to mention the body of the artwork, sizes, spaces, positions etc but most important of all is the preparation of the mental state before the moment of application and along with that until a satisfactory result is achieved.

Continue Reading →


AL-KHAA AL-ASHHAB

AL-KHAA AL-ASHHAB

Al-Khaa Al-Ashhab (1998) is a powerful example of Ali Omar's inimitable interpretation of the Arabic letter. Using the letter khaa as the focal point of the work, he evokes a sense of swiftness and speed in its delineation. The monochrome palette is a deliberate play on the name Ash-hab, which means greyness.

Continue Reading →


LAM ALIF LIBNUL MUTTAZZ

LAM ALIF LIBNUL MUTTAZZ

This stunning piece displays the power of contrast in colour. The clear-cut ideas, between the visual and the writing in poetry. The poem featured in this artwork is by Abbassi Amir Ibnal Muttaaz.

It reflects the historical state of the Abbassid Caliph in the Amir Al Mu’mineen’s times in the ninth century at the heart of the Arab lands and Muslim civilization. Here the poem engages in the description of the intellectual who because of his sense of knowledge, experience, and expression, could be interpreted like this:

Continue Reading →


AL HAA ‘INFORMAL DEBATE’

AL HAA ‘INFORMAL DEBATE’

The artwork features one line of poetry by the eminent poet Abu Al Tayyib Al Mutanabbi, the meaning of which in general says:

“Great souls carry enormously ambitious dreams but all that for the misfortune of their earthly bodies”.

Continue Reading →


THE SIXTH ODE

THE SIXTH ODE

This is one of a group of seven paintings that celebrates the Seven Odes of Arabic poetry, Al Muallaqat As Sabaa or Prize Poems, which enjoy a special place in Arabic literature due to their power of eloquence and historic relevance.

When a poem was judged to be exceptional, it was embroidered in gold on silk clot hand hung on the Kaaba as a sign of general acclaim. Over the years, the Prize Poems which were thus hung at the Kaaba assumed a universal context and appeal.

Continue Reading →


LETTER FORM FA

LETTER FORM FA

This artwork portrays a very tranquil state of mind over harmonious quiet colours. The poem is by the eminent Islamic poet Hassan Ibnil Thabit (the Prophet’s poet, PBUH). The poem says in what could be interpreted like this (praising Al Ansar in Madinah):

Continue Reading →


KALLA

KALLA

Recalls samples of poetry which rejects domination by big powers as much as it rejects acts of terrorism by individuals, states or invading armies as much as it condemns corruption, environmental and cultural abuses.

Lines of poetry expressing in general or some in specific terms that we are all in this together. Humanity would not be able to run away from itself, and if all want to live in peace and harmony, we need to face the facts and the people and systems that are behind all this injustice in the world.

Continue Reading →


AHAJE JUHA

AHAJE JUHA

Juha was and still is a very important figure in Arabic literature (mainly the verbal literature) and Juha was a name for Dujain ibn Thabit in the early days of Islamic civil society (1,400 years approx.) with a very rich collection of humour in contradicted forms of wisdom and foolish or unpredictable material, which all make a sounding point of view towards people, politics and behaviour of the society in all its endeavours. But Juha did not stop here, as one man as he was in the beginning, but other people who have an exceptional talent like the original Juha had been added during the Arab and Islamic societies through history.

Continue Reading →


LAMMATUL LAMM

LAMMATUL LAMM

This artwork shows the grabbing of the expression Lamm, the Arabic equivalent of the English letter L. It has powerful, dominant blows of brush strokes in single colours softened by sensitive swipes in middles tones of the pigment making this complicated piece of art very simple and vice-versa.

Continue Reading →


LA TAHINN - DO NOT ALLOW SELF-DEGRADATION

LA TAHINN - DO NOT ALLOW SELF-DEGRADATION

At a glance, this artwork presents a strong culture, an array of fresh, pleasant colours handled with ease and splendour.

Poems by Abi Firas Al Hamadani about standing head high dignified and proud even though the world could be against you.

Continue Reading →


ALIF DHAMMAH

ALIF DHAMMAH

This is a powerful stroke of the letter Alif in black with shades of orange making the background. This is the third of four pieces of artwork where the position of the stroke around the hamzah is going to determine the sound of the letter Alif, in this case, the Dhammah is above the hamzah, becoming an ‘oo’ sound.

Continue Reading →


RAMYATON KHATIFAH

RAMYATON KHATIFAH

This is a piece where I say in it the manifestations of the expression was faster to exist than the elements of execution, so it is a hold up between these two opposing sides, in mono colour full, half and sensitive degrees of impressions.

The poems are from the very rich and well-known reference in Arabic literature – Bahjat Al Majahis by Ibi Abdil Birr Al Qurtobi. The general meaning of the poems is as follows:

Continue Reading →